Impact Driver Footprint Testing Methodology

Impact Driver Footprint Testing

An impact driver’s footprint is an important design feature to consider when looking for the best impact driver. The more compact an impact driver, the easier it can drive screws and fasteners in tight areas, and the more portable it is in your tool belt or toolbox.

Below, we dive deeper into our standardized methodology for how we measure each impact driver’s footprint in our lab.

Check out our impact driver footprint test results to compare measurements for all models in our test fleet.

What we test

We measure each impact driver’s footprint in several orientations to determine how compact and agile each model is when used for everyday jobs.

How we test it

We use digital calipers and measuring tape to take several measurements for each bare tool impact driver. Results are rounded to the nearest 1/8-inch.

We take the following measurements:

Max height (tool only, in.): The maximum tool height with no battery attached from the base to the top height of the head. Measured using digital calipers.

Max width (tool only, in.): The maximum tool width, which is typically the base width since most impact drivers have narrower grips and heads. Measured using digital calipers.

Collet to back (tool only, in.): The length from the tip of the collet to the back of the impact driver’s head. Measured using digital calipers.

Base length (tool only, in.): The length of the base with no battery attached. Most batteries don’t add additional length, which is why we take measurements of the bare tool. Measured using digital calipers.

Base width (tool only, in.): The width of the base with no battery attached. Most batteries don’t add additional length, which is why we take measurements of the bare tool. Measured using digital calipers.

Trigger circumference (tool only, in.): The circumference of the trigger and grip without the trigger depressed. Measured using measuring tape.

Handle circumference (tool only, in.): The circumference of the middle section of the grip. Measured using measuring tape.

Footprint Reference Image
Placing each impact driver next to a reference 12? speed square.

In our reviews, we place a 12-inch rafter square next to each impact for a visual size reference.

We use several data points in our impact driver rating methodology to determine how compact and agile an impact driver is.

Why it matters

Many jobs around the home and on the job site have limited access. For example, you may be driving a screw in a tight interior corner one day and reaching through a narrow opening to tighten a fastener the next day. The more compact and agile an impact driver, the easier it is to fit the tool into tight areas to complete each driving job.

Portability is also important when considering an impact driver’s footprint. An impact driver with a compact design fits easier in a tool belt or toolbox than a bulkier model. Small models also take up less room when stored in a garage, drawer, or cabinet.

Nathan Hamilton
Nathan Hamilton
Nathan Hamilton is the founder of DIY Gear Reviews and a recognized expert in the home and DIY space. He has over 200 bylines covering topics such as power tools, hand tools, and woodworking. Nathan is the strategic director for DIY Gear Reviews, deciding everything from the content covered to designing the testing methodologies for lab-tested reviews. He can be emailed at nhamilton@diygearreviews.com.

Related

Leave a Comment