Milwaukee M12 2462-20 Vs Milwaukee M12 Fuel Surge 2551-20

Milwaukee 2462-20 Angle 5

Milwaukee 2462-20

Quick take

The Milwaukee M12 Fuel Surge 2551-20 is a better impact driver than the Milwaukee M12 2462-20 for several reasons. The 2551-20 offers better build quality, has four versatile drive modes, is faster under load, is more compact tip to tail, and has a brushless motor. Since the 2551-20 is also a hydraulic impact driver, it is quieter and more precise, which is important in the 12V class.

Brand Milwaukee
Platform M12
Motor Brushed
Tested torque in-lbs 491.4
IPM 3,300.0
Drive modes 1
Collet 1/4-inch hex
Same as -
Brand Milwaukee
Platform M12 Fuel Surge
Motor Brushless
Tested torque in-lbs 472.8
IPM 3,400.0
Drive modes 4
Collet 1/4-inch hex
Same as M12 hydraulic

Editorial opinion

Rating

2.75 / 5 ⭐️’s

Methodology used: Light duty

Pros

  • Moderately lightweight
  • Fantastic tool and battery warranty
  • Solid battery run time

Cons

  • Brushed motor
  • Single drive mode reduces driving versatility
  • Slow driving speed

Rating

4.36 / 5 ⭐️’s

Methodology used: Light duty

Pros

  • Outstanding noise performance
  • Compact footprint
  • Versatile drive modes
  • Durable brushless motor
  • Fantastic tool and battery warranty

Cons

  • Poor battery run time
  • Slow driving speed

Global rankings

21 models tested

TestResultRank
Driving speed (sec.)58.321
Torque (in-lbs)491.418
Battery run time (min.)42.010
RPM2,170.021
Bare weight (lbs)1.967
Impacting noise (dBA)98.021
TestResultRank
Driving speed (sec.)24.817
Torque (in-lbs)472.820
Battery run time (min.)26.018
RPM2,972.012
Bare weight (lbs)2.029
Impacting noise (dBA)86.11

Kit and bare tool options

2462-22

Includes (1) M12 Red Lithium CP 1.5Ah battery

2462-20

Bare tool

Lab results

Design & ergonomics

Stands upright w/o battery: No
Stands upright w/ battery: Yes
Grip material: Rubber overgrip
Magnetic holder: No
Bit holder: No
Belt hook: Yes
Handle angle (deg.): 90.0
Head angle (deg.): 103.0

The 2462-20 is highly ergonomic with its unique angles and stance. The battery slots into the handle to give it a svelte footprint compared to other models. Milwaukee’s higher Ah M12 batteries are more traditionally designed to widen and lengthen the base, albeit remaining extremely compact. Without a battery, the 2462-20 doesn’t stand upright.

There is an included belt hook mountable on either side, but no bit holder or magnetic fastener holder is onboard, unlike some Ryobi impact drivers with these features built into the tool.

The forward-leaning angle and head design provide nearly unmatched forward reach in specific driving scenarios.

Design & ergonomics

Stands upright w/o battery: No
Stands upright w/ battery: Yes
Grip material: Rubber overgrip
Magnetic holder: No
Bit holder: No
Belt hook: Yes
Handle angle (deg.): 90.0
Head angle (deg.): 103.0

The 2551-20 follows the design language familiar to Milwaukee’s M12 impact driver lineup with a forward-biased handle and head angle that reaches toward the sky. This design provides solid reach in certain driving scenarios. The handle includes a rubber overgrip that offers good shock absorption.

There is an included belt hook mountable on either side, but no bit holder or magnetic fastener holder is onboard, unlike some Ryobi impact drivers with these features built into the tool.

Uniquely, the battery slots into the handle to give it a svelte design compared to other impact drivers, where the battery widens and lengthens the base. Milwaukee’s higher Ah M12 batteries are more traditionally designed to widen and lengthen the base, albeit remaining extremely compact. Without a battery, the 2551-20 doesn’t stand upright.

Weight

Milwaukee 2462-20 On Scale

Bare weight (lbs): 1.96
Weight w/ 2Ah battery (lbs): 2.35
Weight w/ 2.5Ah battery (lbs):  Not tested
Weight w/ 4Ah battery (lbs):  Not tested
Weight w/ 5Ah battery (lbs): Not tested

The 2462-20 is moderately heavy for a 12V impact driver. However, most 12V impact drivers are light compared to bulkier 18V models, great for reducing fatigue over longer driving sessions.

The working weight can differ significantly depending on the battery run in your setup. To keep it lightweight, we recommend combining the 2462-20 with Milwaukee’s M12 Red Lithium CP 2Ah battery for a good balance of performance and weight.

If weight is less of a concern, Milwaukee offers several higher Ah M12 batteries in its lineup. However, you forego the in-handle design for a slightly bulkier footprint and weight. Upgrading to Milwaukee’s M18 lineup may be more suitable as the size increases.

Compare weight test results

Weight

Milwaukee 2551-20 On Scale

Bare weight (lbs): 2.02
Weight w/ 2Ah battery (lbs): 2.41
Weight w/ 2.5Ah battery (lbs):  Not tested
Weight w/ 4Ah battery (lbs):  Not tested
Weight w/ 5Ah battery (lbs): Not tested

The 2551-20 is moderately heavy for a 12V impact driver in its bare form and with a battery but is lightweight compared to most 18V impact drivers, helping to reduce muscle fatigue.

The working weight can differ significantly depending on the battery run in your setup. To keep it lightweight, we recommend combining the 2551-20 with Milwaukee’s M12 Red Lithium CP 2Ah battery for a good balance of performance and weight.

If weight is less of a concern, Milwaukee offers several higher Ah M12 batteries in its lineup. However, you forego the in-handle design for a slightly bulkier footprint and weight. Upgrading to Milwaukee’s M18 lineup may be more suitable as the size increases.

Compare weight test results

Footprint

Milwaukee 2462-20 Size

Max height (bare tool, in.): 7.000
Max width (bare tool, in.): 2.250
Collet to back length (in.): 6.375
Base length (bare tool, in.): 1.625
Base width (bare tool, in.): 1.625
Trigger circumference (in.): 6.500
Handle circumference (in.): 6.250

The 2462-20 casts a thin shadow viewed from the front and back. However, it is bulkier from other angles, especially the collet-to-back length. This extended design makes it feel slightly less nimble in hand compared to other 12V impact drivers with stubbier heads.

Compare footprint test results

Footprint

Milwaukee 2551-20 Size

Max height (bare tool, in.): 7.000
Max width (bare tool, in.): 2.375
Collet to back length (in.): 5.125
Base length (bare tool, in.): 1.625
Base width (bare tool, in.): 1.625
Trigger circumference (in.): 6.500
Handle circumference (in.): 6.250

The 2551-20 is highly compact with its low max width and relatively short collet-to-back length. The size helps it fit nicely into tight corners and openings.

Compare footprint test results

Motor

Motor: Brushed
Impacts per minute: 3,300.0

One critical feature cut to make the price point is the 2462-20 uses a brushed motor. Brushed motors are less efficient, less durable, louder, and don’t drive as well as brushless motors, which are commonly used in most models nowadays.

The Makita 12V CXT DT04Z, Milwaukee M12 Fuel Surge 2551-20, and Dewalt 12V Xtreme DCF801 are excellent competing models with a brushless motor.

The 2462-20’s anvil hits with 3300.0 impacts per minute, low compared to most 12V impact drivers. Whether this makes a difference to you depends on your intended usage. The low impacts per minute are one reason the 2462-20 consistently and cleanly finished screws in different work materials in our tests. However, the impacts also explain why the 2462-20 drives big screws and lag bolts slowly.

Motor

Motor: Brushless
Impacts per minute: 3,400.0

Brushless motors, like the one included in the 2551-20, improve driving efficiency, increase battery run time, and are more durable than their brushed motor counterparts.

Understandably since it’s a hydraulic impact driver, the 2551-20’s advertised 3400.0 impacts per minute are low, explaining some of the slow driving performance in our tests and some of the precision screw finishing as well. Most tools have tradeoffs, and the impacting frequency is worth considering based on your intended usage.

One differentiating factor is that the percussive impact is powered by hydraulic action. The expanding and contracting oil pulses spin the collet, resulting in a less violent and more prolonged impact than traditional hammer-impacting models.

Drive modes

Drive modes: 1
Drive mode 1:  High speed 
Drive mode 2:  N/A 
Drive mode 3:  N/A 
Drive mode 4:  N/A 
Variable speed trigger: Yes

Only one drive mode reduces the 2462-20’s versatility. Additional drive modes would help the 2462-20 tackle differing driving tasks, ranging from precisely recessing screws into soft materials like MDF to driving lag bolts in timber.

This said, the single drive mode is well-balanced. It accurately finished differing-length screws in dimensional lumber, MDF, and drywall, albeit with less brute force than other impact drivers.

Drive modes

Milwaukee 2551-20 Drive Modes

Drive modes: 4
Drive mode 1:  High speed 
Drive mode 2:  Medium speed 
Drive mode 3:  Low speed 
Drive mode 4:  Self-tapping 
Variable speed trigger: Yes

There are four driving modes on the 2551-20, great for driving versatility. Drive modes we label as 1, 2, 3, and 4 correspond to high speed, medium speed, low speed, and self-tapping screw modes. The advertised impacts per minute for the speed modes are 3400.00, 2200.0, and 950.0, respectively.

Drive mode 1 is ideal for heavier-duty tasks, such as driving lag bolts and decking screws. This mode finishes screws nicely, compared to the brute force high-speed modes on most 18V impact drivers.

Drive mode 2 is the best if you want a clean and consistent screw recess. The mode has enough power to drive screws into dimensional lumber, treated lumber, plywood, and hard and softwood.

We found ourselves favoring drive mode 2 over drive mode 1 since the lower setting lacks power, and drive mode 2 is already highly accurate in all density materials.

The self-tapping mode works well enough driving standard screw sizes in ½-inch to 1-inch lengths in thin sheet metal. In this mode, the collet spins and then stops once a specific light rotational force is reached, then it starts again slowly for a short moment. Holding the trigger repeats the cycle, helpful when the first cycle doesn’t set the screw at full depth. Since the rotational force is so sensitive, this drive mode only works well for niche driving scenarios.

Also, the trigger must be fully pushed. Any shorter trigger draw results in operating in a normal impacting mode.

Driving speed

GRK total driving time forward (sec.): 58.3
GRK average driving time forward (sec.): 11.7
GRK total driving time reverse (sec.): 49.1
GRK average driving time reverse (sec.): 9.8

The 2462-20 scraped the bottom of the barrel in our GRK driving speed tests. However, this test doesn’t tell the whole story, and the 2462-20 can handle similar driving tasks when you don’t have the perfect tool within reach.

All 12V impact drivers bog down driving big structural screws and lag bolts. 12V impact drivers can do the job in a pinch, but their batteries drain quickly with the motors working overtime.

We tested driving other common screw lengths and sizes into different-density materials, such as treated lumber, dimensional lumber, MDF, plywood, and soft and hardwood. Speed isn’t what matters in these tests since speed isn’t markedly different across models. The 2462-20 handily and accurately drove screws in all these situations tested.

Compare driving speed test results

Driving speed

GRK total driving time forward (sec.): 24.8
GRK average driving time forward (sec.): 5.0
GRK total driving time reverse (sec.): 17.7
GRK average driving time reverse (sec.): 3.5

The 2551-20 isn’t designed for driving big structural screws and lag bolts, as demonstrated by its lagging performance in our GRK speed tests designed to test brute force. However, when put up against 12V impact drivers, the 2551-20 shines in these tests.

It’s also an extremely capable impact driver for its intended usage, primarily driving screws 3 inches and shorter. Speed isn’t necessarily crucial in these scenarios. Instead, capable driving power and accuracy prevail. The 2551-20 excels in these lighter and medium-duty jobs, especially with its quiet oil-impulse impact.

Compare driving speed test results

Torque

Milwaukee 2462-20 Torquemeter
Milwaukee 2462-20 Torque Chart Image

Max torque drive mode 1 (in-lbs): 491.4
Max torque drive mode 2 (in-lbs): N/A
Max torque drive mode 3 (in-lbs): N/A
Max torque drive mode 4 (in-lbs): N/A

The 2462-20 is moderately underpowered for a 12V impact driver, and it can’t match the twisting force of more powerful 18V models, which are ideal for heavy-duty tasks. The torque output further highlights the 2462-20’s intended usage, primarily light and medium-duty tasks that don’t demand high torque output.

The Milwaukee M12 Fuel 3453-20 has among the highest torque output we’ve tested in the 12V class.

Compare torque test results

Torque

Milwaukee 2551-20 Torquemeter
Milwaukee 2551-20 Torque Charts

Max torque drive mode 1 (in-lbs): 472.8
Max torque drive mode 2 (in-lbs): 241.8
Max torque drive mode 3 (in-lbs): 73.8
Max torque drive mode 4 (in-lbs): N/A

All hydraulic impact drivers offer lower torque output than equivalent models with anvil-based impacting mechanisms, including the 2551-20. This impact driver generates enough torque to bust loose some lug nuts and light bolts, but it isn’t powerful enough to tackle more stubborn fasteners. The torque profile is one of the trade-offs made for the quieter and smoother impacting experience.

Compare torque test results

Battery run time

Power type: Cordless
Battery run time (min.): 42.0
Battery tested: 12V Red Lithium CP 2Ah (48-11-2420)
Voltage: 12

The 2462-20 turned in a respectable battery run time, especially for a brushed motor, including beating out many 12V impact drivers we tested. The Makita 12V CXT DT04Z and Ryobi 18V One+ PSBID01 are worth considering for improved battery performance.

We tested battery run time with the 2Ah battery version. With a higher Ah battery, expect the battery run time to continue outperforming competing models running the same Ah setup.

Compare battery test results

Battery run time

Power type: Cordless
Battery run time (min.): 26.0
Battery tested: 12V Red Lithium CP 2Ah (48-11-2420)
Voltage: 12

One crucial downside is the lacking battery run time performance, which is familiar with several Milwaukee impact drivers.The Makita 12V CXT DT04Z and Dewalt 12V Xtreme DCF801 have much better battery life.

We tested battery run time with the 2Ah battery version. With an M12 5Ah battery, expect the battery run time to increase but continue underperforming competing models running the same Ah setup.

Compare battery test results

Battery lineup

Milwaukee M12 Battery Lineup

Milwaukee offers 1.5Ah, 2Ah, 2.5Ah, 3Ah, 4Ah, 5Ah, and 6Ah batteries in its M12 lineup. Upgrading to the higher Ah options increases battery run time and improves driving performance, though we’ve not tested all of these batteries to understand the cost tradeoffs. The 4Ah and higher batteries increase the base footprint over the in-handle-only, smaller Ah versions.

Having at least two batteries in your setup is best so you don’t miss a beat when draining one battery. We recommend buying two Milwaukee M12 Red Lithium CP 2Ah batteries for most M12 impact driver setups for a good balance of performance, price, and size.

Many Milwaukee impact drivers come in kits with chargers that charge multiple voltage batteries in one, conveniently saving space in your shop if you have several M12 and M18 ecosystem tools.

Battery lineup

Milwaukee M12 Battery Lineup

Milwaukee offers 1.5Ah, 2Ah, 2.5Ah, 3Ah, 4Ah, 5Ah, and 6Ah batteries in its M12 lineup. Upgrading to the higher Ah options increases battery run time and improves driving performance, though we’ve not tested all of these batteries to understand the cost tradeoffs. The 4Ah and higher batteries increase the base footprint over the in-handle-only, smaller Ah versions.

Having at least two batteries in your setup is best so you don’t miss a beat when draining one battery. We recommend buying two Milwaukee M12 Red Lithium CP 2Ah batteries for most M12 impact driver setups for a good balance of performance, price, and size.

Many Milwaukee impact drivers come in kits with chargers that charge multiple voltage batteries in one, conveniently saving space in your shop if you have several M12 and M18 ecosystem tools.

Charging time

Milwaukee 2656-20 Fuel Gauge

Charger tested: Milwaukee M12 & M18 Multi-Volt (48-59-1812)
Charging time 2Ah battery (min.): 38.0
Charging time 2.5Ah battery (min.): Not tested
Charging time 4Ah battery (min.): Not tested
Charging time 5Ah battery (min.): Not tested
Charging time per Ah (min.): 19.0
Fuel gauge: Onboard tool

The Milwaukee M12 and M18 multi-volt charger (model 48-59-1812) included in most kits is reasonably fast at charging batteries, including to beat out team red’s most frequent adversary, Dewalt. It takes 38 minutes to charge an M12 2Ah battery, or 19 minutes per amp-hour.

Milwaukee’s 48-59-1812 charger charges multiple battery voltages in one, conveniently saving space in your shop if you have several M12 and M18 ecosystem tools.

Compare charging test results

Charging time

Milwaukee 2551-20 Fuel Gauge

Charger tested: Milwaukee M12 & M18 Multi-Volt (48-59-1812)
Charging time 2Ah battery (min.): 38.0
Charging time 2.5Ah battery (min.): Not tested
Charging time 4Ah battery (min.): Not tested
Charging time 5Ah battery (min.): Not tested
Charging time per Ah (min.): 19.0
Fuel gauge: Onboard tool

The Milwaukee M12 and M18 multi-volt charger (model 48-59-1812) included in most kits is reasonably fast at charging batteries, including to beat out team red’s most frequent adversary, Dewalt. It takes 38 minutes to charge an M12 2Ah battery, or 19 minutes per amp-hour.

Milwaukee’s 48-59-1812 charger charges multiple battery voltages in one, conveniently saving space in your shop if you have several M12 and M18 ecosystem tools.

Compare charging test results

RPM

Milwaukee 2462-20 RPM Charts

Max RPM drive mode 1 (fwd.): 2,170.0
Max RPM drive mode 2 (fwd.): N/A
Max RPM drive mode 3 (fwd.): N/A
Max RPM drive mode 4 (fwd.): N/A
Max RPM drive mode 1 (rev.): 2,045.0
Max RPM drive mode 2 (rev.): N/A
Max RPM drive mode 3 (rev.): N/A
Max RPM drive mode 4 (rev.): N/A

The 2462-20’s single drive mode has very low measured RPM, great for precision driving but a downside combined with its torque profile for quickly driving big screws and bolts.

There is no significant RPM difference between forward and reverse. Some Makita impact drivers increase RPM in select drive mode settings in reverse to help in loosening bolts and stubborn screws. The 2462-20 won’t bust loose stingy bolts (it doesn’t have the RPM and torque), but it handled removing any difficult screw we tested.

Compare RPM test results

RPM

Milwaukee 2551-20 RPM Charts

Max RPM drive mode 1 (fwd.): 2,972.0
Max RPM drive mode 2 (fwd.): 1,952.0
Max RPM drive mode 3 (fwd.): 885.0
Max RPM drive mode 4 (fwd.): 2,982.0
Max RPM drive mode 1 (rev.): 3,011.0
Max RPM drive mode 2 (rev.): 2,036.0
Max RPM drive mode 3 (rev.): 927.0
Max RPM drive mode 4 (rev.): 2,773.0

The 2551-20 is moderately fast for a 12V impact driver, helping to set screws quickly. One potential risk of a high RPM is cam-out and stripping screws. This risk is more of an issue for more powerful 18V impact drivers. The 2551-20 is well-balanced and impresses with its ability to avoid cam-out and stripped screws.

There is no significant measured RPM difference between forward and reverse for each drive mode. Some models increase RPM in reverse for specific drive modes to help bust loose bolts and stubborn screws. We didn’t encounter a situation where the 2551-20 was underpowered removing screws.

Compare RPM test results

Driving clearance

Min. interior width clearance (in.): 9.125
Min. top edge clearance (in.): 1.000
Min. interior 45-deg. clearance (in.): 7.000

The 2462-20’s uniquely-designed angles and long collet-to-back length don’t make it ideal for driving inside all tight spaces and corners, as demonstrated in our clearance tests. This performance is most noticeable in our 45-degree interior clearance test, where the long length significantly hindered its performance.

Compare driving clearance test results

Driving clearance

Min. interior width clearance (in.): 7.750
Min. top edge clearance (in.): 1.125
Min. interior 45-deg. clearance (in.): 6.250

The 2551-20 performed moderately well in our clearance tests due to its compact, short collet-to-back footprint, making it suitable for fitting in tight spaces and openings. Compared to more traditionally-designed models, the in-handle battery design also improves its clearance performance.

The Milwaukee M18 Fuel 3453-20 shined in our clearance tests, primarily due to its stubbier collet-to-back length.

Compare driving clearance test results

Noise

2462-20 Impact Driver Noise Chart

Max noise no load (dBA): 71.9
Max impacting noise (dBA): 98.0

The 2462-20 is loud when impacting, surprising for such a small impact driver. This impact driver turned in some of the highest decibel noise performance we’ve come across in our tests.

The Makita 12V CXT DT04Z is a better pick for improved noise performance.

The Milwaukee M12 Fuel Surge 2551-20 and Milwaukee M18 Fuel Surge 2760-20 are incredibly quiet impact drivers since both are hydraulic impact drivers with far more subtle impacts.

Compare noise test results

Noise

2551-20 Impact Driver Noise Chart

Max noise no load (dBA): 87.7
Max impacting noise (dBA): 86.1

The 2551-20 is a dream regarding its noise performance, which is one of the primary reasons to buy a hydraulic impact driver. The noise when impacting is exceptionally low compared to hammer-based impact driver designs.

The noise performance is most noticeably low when driving standard screw sizes and lengths under 3 inches. The 2551-20 is as close to whispering as you’ll get with an impact driver. We measured as low as 84.3 dBA impacting short screws, approximating an airplane’s inside ambient noise.

Consider the Milwaukee M18 Fuel Surge 2760-20 for a more powerful hydraulic impact driver with exceptional noise performance.

Compare noise test results

Vibration

Max head vibration no load (m/s2): 14.5
Max grip vibration no load (m/s2): 0.7

Compare vibration test results

Vibration

Max head vibration no load (m/s2): 21.2
Max grip vibration no load (m/s2): 1.2

Grip vibration is incredibly low with the 2551-20’s less violent and muted oil-impulse impacts, making it ideal if you want an easy-to-handle impact driver.

Compare vibration test results

Light

Milwaukee 2462-20 Light
Milwaukee 2462-20 Light Closeup

Light: Yes
Light on/off: No
Number of lights: 1
Light time delay (sec.): 10.0

The work light brightly illuminates a moderately large work area. As expected with the best budget impact drivers, the work light can’t be disabled and doesn’t act as a dedicated flashlight.

Several Makita impact drivers include a dedicated flashlight functionally with the forward/reverse switch set to neutral.

Light

Milwaukee 2551-20 Light
Milwaukee 2551-20 Light Closeup

Light: Yes
Light on/off: No
Number of lights: 1
Light time delay (sec.): 10.0

The work light brightly illuminates a moderately large work area. The work light can’t be disabled and doesn’t act as a dedicated flashlight.

Several Makita impact drivers include a dedicated flashlight functionally with the forward/reverse switch set to neutral.

Collet

Milwaukee 2462-20 Collet Closeup

Collet size: 1/4-inch hex
Quick-change collet: Yes
Bit-eject collet: No
Easy-insert collet: No

The 2462-20 is not suitable for one-handed bit changes. It takes two hands to change bits, one to slide the collet and the other to insert or remove the bit. The collet has no easy-insert or bit eject feature, which helps with one-handed bit changes.

Milwaukee rarely includes a bit-eject feature on its impact drivers, but some models have a smooth easy-insert design.

Many Dewalt impact drivers include easy-insert and bit-eject collets that are smooth with the best collet design we’ve come across.

Collet

Milwaukee 2551-20 Collet Closeup

Collet size: 1/4-inch hex
Quick-change collet: Yes
Bit-eject collet: No
Easy-insert collet: No

Milwaukee rarely includes a bit-eject feature on its impact drivers, but some models have an incredibly smooth easy-insert design, both of which are true with the 2551-20.

Many Dewalt impact drivers include easy-insert and bit-eject collets that are smooth with the best collet design we’ve come across.

App integration

App integration: None

There is no bluetooth app integration to review impact driver diagnostics or to customize driving profiles on your phone. Some high-end Milwaukee impact drivers come in a One-Key version which includes an app integration to track impact driver usage, displays tool diagnostics, and allows you to set custom driving profiles, such as adjusting the RPM for each drive mode.

App integration

App integration: None

There is no bluetooth app integration to review impact driver diagnostics or to customize driving profiles on your phone. Some high-end Milwaukee impact drivers come in a One-Key version which includes an app integration to track impact driver usage, displays tool diagnostics, and allows you to set custom driving profiles, such as adjusting the RPM for each drive mode.

Warranty

Tool warranty (years): 5
Battery warranty (years): 2-3 (depends on model)

Milwaukee stands behind the durability of its drills with exceptionally long warranties. The 2462-20 has a five-year warranty, which is among the longest offered by any manufacturer. Milwaukee’s M12 Li-Ion batteries have two or three-year warranties, depending on the specific model.

The long warranty removes most concerns over the durability of the brushed motor included in this impact driver.

Warranty

Tool warranty (years): 5
Battery warranty (years): 2-3 (depends on model)

Milwaukee stands behind the durability of its drills with exceptionally long warranties. The 2551-20 has a five-year warranty, which is among the longest offered by any manufacturer. Milwaukee’s M12 Li-Ion batteries have two or three-year warranties, depending on the specific model.

Nathan Hamilton
Nathan Hamilton
Nathan Hamilton is the founder of DIY Gear Reviews and a recognized expert in the home and DIY space. He has over 200 bylines covering topics such as power tools, hand tools, and woodworking. Nathan is the strategic director for DIY Gear Reviews, deciding everything from the content covered to designing the testing methodologies for lab-tested reviews. He can be emailed at nhamilton@diygearreviews.com.

Related

Leave a Comment